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How To Troubleshoot Network Adapter Cards?

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Bilal Ahmad answered
Network problems often result from malfunctioning network adapter cards. The process of troubleshooting the network adapter works like any other kind of troubleshooting process: Start with the simple. The following list details some aspects you can check if you think your network adapter card might be malfunctioning:
A) Make sure the cable is properly connected to the card.
B) Confirm that you have the correct network adapter card driver and that the driver is installed properly (see Chapter 5). Be sure the card is properly bound to the appropriate transport protocol.
C) Make sure the network adapter card and the network adapter card drivers are compatible with your operating system. If you use Windows NT, consult the Windows NT hardware compatibility list. If you use Windows 95 or another operating system, rely on the adapter card vendor specifications.
D) Test for resource conflicts. Make sure another device isn't attempting to use the same resources. If you think a resource conflict might be the problem, but you can't pinpoint the conflict using Windows NT Diagnostics, Windows 95's Device Manager, or some other diagnostic program, try removing all the cards except the network adapter and then replacing the cards one by one. Check the network with each addition to determine which device is causing the conflict.
E) Run the network adapter card's diagnostic software. This will often indicate which resource on the network card is failing.
F) Examine the jumper and DIP switch settings on the card. Make sure the resource settings are consistent with the settings configured through the operating system.
G) Make sure the card is inserted properly in the slot. Remove and reset the card.
H) If necessary, remove the card and clean the connector fingers (don't use an eraser because it leaves grit on the card).
I) Replace the card with one that you know works. If the connection works with a different card, you know the card is the problem. Token Ring network adapters with failure rates that exceed a preset tolerance level might actually remove themselves from the network. Try replacing the card. Some Token Ring networks also can experience problems if a Token Ring card set at a ring speed of 16 Mbps is inserted into a ring using a 4 Mbps ring speed and vice versa. Broadcast storms are often caused by faulty network adapters as well.

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