Does the architecture of a building have much effect upon the people living there?

An architect friend once told me it would be possible to construct a house so mentally disruptive, that the space itself could cause a married couple to get divorced. What is your experience? How much does the structure of the place we live (or work) affect our mental and emotional state?

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9 Answers

dragonfly forty-six Profile

First off, I'd like to say that I enjoyed this question. It made me think about architecture in a different way. I'd say, yes it's very possible. Architecture is a form of art to me, that definitely can and does illicit emotions from me. That being said, if I had to live here or even work here, I'd not only be divorced but unhappy. My surroundings must be neutral or aesthetically pleasing, this example is anything but. As a matter of fact when ever I have to drive by this thing, I feel annoyed.

Now let's move on to internal living space, let's say the home was frustrating to live in. Couldn't do every day things without frustration, the money lost in building such a frustrating home. Now, I've been married for a long time. I wouldn't want to think that something like that could cause me to leave my husband and divorce. It seems so shallow. But these things I believe could erode my good nature over time. Sort of like water torture. What is that saying, "Happy wife, happy life."


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dragonfly forty-six
L.A. has some beautiful architecture. Especially 1930's art deco. In my town we have beautiful examples of the Craftsman style. I really enjoy driving around specifically looking at different examples of architecture. The building above does nothing for me, it actually makes me very uncomfortable. I've been to a few concerts there, even with the beauty of the interior and the spirit lifting music, cannot get me past the feeling of this building for me.
Didge Doo
Didge Doo commented
Yow! I'd go troppo if I had to go into that place every day.
Virginia Lou
Virginia Lou commented
DragonFly's comment makes me wish to go to L.A. and just look at the art deco, Craftsman, and maybe other beautiful buildings...

Ever since walking through the Frank Lloyd Wright home in Iowa, architecture has seemed quite entrancing, especially in light of my architect friend's long-ago comment about how it can affect our moods...
Call me Z Profile
Call me Z answered

Absolutely. There are even studies that show how a room or building is lit or what color it is affects us mentally and emotionally. 

Let me give three examples:

-The house from the Addams Family

-Any apartment in a ghetto,  anywhere

-Trump Tower

How could residing in any of these places NOT affect a person?

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Jann Nikka
Jann Nikka commented
I personally would not live in or go into a home, apt, building that is, run down ugly, scary or dilapidated.
Virginia Lou
Virginia Lou commented
Zee, I looked up Trump Tower...seems to be two of them? One in Chicago and the other NYC? (I actually thought he had it in Reno or Las Vegas...)
Call me Z
Call me Z commented
We'll go with the better known one in NY. Gilded, haughty, shameless even. Like its proprietor.
Rooster Cogburn Profile
Rooster Cogburn , Rooster Cogburn, answered

It sure would if it was like the house from 13 Ghosts !


Jann Nikka Profile
Jann Nikka answered

I personally would not enter a building, house, apt or any structure that I consider ugly, scary, mass murder has happen, seances, people homes I know that say they are witches, devil, Satan or hideous... I will only knowingly enter beautiful and happy structures.

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Jann Nikka
Jann Nikka commented
Virginia, my inner essence would not be happy if I live in a "Ugly" place and I could not even think about entering a "Ugly" building.
Virginia Lou
Virginia Lou commented
Jann, how do you feel about the building DragonFly posted? That she does not even like to drive by?
Jann Nikka
Jann Nikka commented
I'm glad you ask LOL. I would not go inside, it's too "Confusing" and ugly. Probably pretty inside LOL.
Didge Doo Profile
Didge Doo answered

The focal point of your question seems to be "architecture" and "living" rather than, say working. So my answer would only apply to homes and not necessarily to their state of repair, location, or social environment.

Unless a design was outrageous I think most people could adapt to most houses without too much ill effect. It beats hell out of sleeping in the street. The worst I could think of is a house designed without windows which, to me, would feel like a cell. Well, more like a padded cell.

If an evil architect was intent on driving somebody mad I'm sure that designing a home where the angles were slightly off and the room measurements a little askew would be a good way to start.

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Jann Nikka
Jann Nikka commented
I would happily and gladly sleep in the street on concrete rather than sleep in the houses, apts and buildings I mentioned in my comments.
Didge Doo
Didge Doo commented
I hope you never have to do that, Jan. But, if you do, I hope the nights are warm and the pavement soft.
Jann Nikka
Jann Nikka commented
LOL, Didge, I know me and I'm a caution scary person. Yep
Pepper pot Profile
Pepper pot answered

Yes of course, Freemasons share the same knowledge as the pythagorians "sacred geometry,"  the "secret teachings" of all ages, also the Gnostics and Ophites which were all serpent cults of "knowledge." Anywhere "op" is mentioned this comes from the root word for serpent. There are plenty of videos online explaining sacred geometry, the seed of life, fruit of life, flower of life, the tree of life, the vesica pisces or Jesus fish, and Metratrons cube. Freemasons were not accurate about building structure for no reason, they believed it could harness and manipulate energy etc. Their lodges are set out like Solomons temple, a copy of the human body or as jesus calls it temple. This is where their rituals are played out. Another interesting video is Secrets Hidden in plain site it's long but I enjoyed it.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=L777RhL_Fz4


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Virginia Lou
Virginia Lou commented
Well...PP, if you would give me just a bit more listen...because interestingly I have always preferred the KJV, quite intriguing that Sir Francis was Gnostic!

Also, I have loved the Virgin Mary, take delight in her connection with Isis, and this video relates them both back to Inanna, the Sumerian mother goddess...also appreciating the 'flower of life' design, found as far back as the Osirian Temple in Ancient Egypt, 3300 BC at least...

And I really like the Vesica Pisces too, they even called that intersection a vulva!

"There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio,
Than are dreamt of in your philosophy." (Hamlet)

Okay, ty Pepper Pot...had fun...see you on the next Q!
Pepper pot
Pepper pot commented
Very good Virginia, greatly enjoy your company :)
Virginia Lou
Virginia Lou commented
Dear Pepper Pot, well it's Past midnight on the Pacific raincoast here in Washington State, and I just want to show you one more quote I found on that film...I actually ended up watching about three hours of it...anyway I just really loved this one!
Here you go...

"Every idea, extended into infinity, becomes its own opposite."
~ George Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel (1770–1831), German philosopher.
KB Baldwin Profile
KB Baldwin answered

Old novel (mid 60's I think),  "Squares of the City", used this notion as a part of the plot structure. 

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Virginia Lou
Virginia Lou commented
KB, this book is reviewed on Goodreads...you prolly already know...I had not encountered author John Brunner before, may end up reading at least one of his works!
Oh and yes indeed, it was 1966.
Emily Harris Profile
Emily Harris answered

Architecture not only affects society on a high level but also on a more personal level, it can have a profound impact on its occupants. Everything from the layout of the space to the material finishes can contribute towards occupant health, mood, and productivity.

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